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Old 04-16-2012   #11
Hendercrazy
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Default Re: Dubbing Advice

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Originally Posted by cardboardwalk View Post
Oops! Sorry my bad. I should have emphasized the fact that I was referring to the editing of clips to make it match. Unless they do that in the business which would be interesting news to hear.
Ahhh. Gotcha.

I believe some studios animate first... then have actors dub their voices to the characters and also vice versa where the lines are recorded first and animators work to follow those lines.

I'm working with an animator right now on a project that is doing the latter... just having me voice act the script lines and he's going to animate the character's mouths (and some other elements) to match the words so it looks naturally spoken.
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Old 04-16-2012   #12
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Default Re: Dubbing Advice

The general rule is that with anime, the voices have to match the animation. With western animation, the animation matches the voices.
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Old 07-26-2012   #13
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Default Re: Dubbing Advice

The amazing thing is I find dubbing is more work and difficult to do.
But ironically it pays a lot less than original voice when you don't have to follow a rythmo-band.

Crazy, eh?
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Old 07-26-2012   #14
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Default Re: Dubbing Advice

Whatever you see on the Foreign Language requests, everything is confirmed by one of the links.

I don't mean to annoy anyone with completing requests, but it feels so lonely with one role or language.

I'm wishing to dub in Los Angeles for Spanish and French; everyone else records in Mexico, Canada, Spain or France. The airfare is too expensive.
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Old 07-26-2012   #15
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Default Re: Dubbing Advice

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Originally Posted by Messycat View Post
The amazing thing is I find dubbing is more work and difficult to do.
But ironically it pays a lot less than original voice when you don't have to follow a rythmo-band.

Crazy, eh?
The Rythmo-Band technique was common in Eastern Canada a long time ago, and was used by Optimum Productions for Sailor Moon (the voice actors usually point out how hard it was to get used to). I've never tried live-action dubbing myself, but I would imagine the Rythmo Band would come in handy (if they use it at all anymore, it's probably done very differently now).

Ironically in Japan, they also have to match lip flaps for anime, even if it's native to their country, the only exception was for 'Akira', where the Japanese voice actors recorded before any animation was done. It's usually done almost the exact same way as in the US, though they often record in pairs, or occasionally groups in Japan (but they don't put quite as much emphasis on getting the lip movements absolutely perfect). They even look at a screen with a timecode while they're recording.
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Old 07-26-2012   #16
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Default Re: Dubbing Advice

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Originally Posted by PurpleWarrior13 View Post
The Rythmo-Band technique was common in Eastern Canada a long time ago, and was used by Optimum Productions for Sailor Moon (the voice actors usually point out how hard it was to get used to). I've never tried live-action dubbing myself, but I would imagine the Rythmo Band would come in handy (if they use it at all anymore, it's probably done very differently now).

Ironically in Japan, they also have to match lip flaps for anime, even if it's native to their country, the only exception was for 'Akira', where the Japanese voice actors recorded before any animation was done. It's usually done almost the exact same way as in the US, though they often record in pairs, or occasionally groups in Japan (but they don't put quite as much emphasis on getting the lip movements absolutely perfect). They even look at a screen with a timecode while they're recording.
I've done some dubbing professionally and have only ever done it with a rythmo-band. So it's definitely still used here in Montreal at least.
Never done dubbing without one.
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Old 07-26-2012   #17
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Default Re: Dubbing Advice

Hmmm... That's interesting. Glad to see the system still running! I'm sure it's much easier than working with a timecode! lol What kind of stuff is being recorded in Montreal? Now, I'm interested! XD
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Old 07-26-2012   #18
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Default Re: Dubbing Advice

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Hmmm... That's interesting. Glad to see the system still running! I'm sure it's much easier than working with a timecode! lol What kind of stuff is being recorded in Montreal? Now, I'm interested! XD
Not sure at the moment. I am not currently working on any dub projects.
Last dub I auditioned for was kind of an Aladdin story animation. I don't recall the name of it.
A lot of what I've auditioned for or done is french animation being dubbed into english.
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Old 03-29-2013   #19
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Default Re: Dubbing Advice

The notation of matching from the first mouth flap to the last one rather than trying to match each one is great advice. Next time I'm watching animation, I'll give this a shot. One of my good friends was an ADR director for Magnitude 8 a while back, and we've actually been pausing subbed scenes in "Persona 4" and "Code Geass" to try to match the mouth flaps. He's a good director. I've been learning a lot, and appreciate his help.

I really, seriously, want to become a voice actor, so any help is highly appreciated. It's the only thing I can see myself doing for a long time and enjoying it. I don't care if I get paid or not. I just want to be in that booth.
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Old 12-31-2013   #20
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Smile Re: Dubbing Advice

I've done a couple fan dubs before, so here's my advice for you.

Copyright:
Since pretty much every anime is licensed you're going to have to fight with some copyright issues
So to avoid this I always put a little 20-30 second "disclaimer" clip stating I don't own it, done by fans, belongs to ---, and so on. I also always flip the video, to avoid even more copyright conflict.

Scripting:
Writing the script is hard. Since the japanese can have a bunch of words with just two lip flaps and that's not enough lip flaps to say anything in english, you'll have to make a few tweaks. If it doesn't fit the lip flaps it's just going to look messy, so putting the extra effort into making it fit them is good

SFX:
This is seriously the biggest hiccup in the entire dubbing process. It's practically impossible to create the perfect fan made SFX. There's always going to be a mild problem. The footsteps are gone, or there's a glitchy noise every now and then, or the drums in the BGM have gone missing! But as long as you get the job done it'll still look fine!

That's about all the advice I can give! Hope that helped
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